Uncategorized

Request from a Reader

We are hoping someone can help out Wendell, who submitted this comment (below) looking for information on the current owners of the Fratt Mansion. There is a lovely informative article about the home, its current owners, and its restoration on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s website. If anyone has more information for Wendell, please let us know.

Wendell Affield

68.235.80.70
Submitted on 2013/05/10 at 1:53 am

I am the great grandson of Charles Diller Fratt. My grandmother was Elsie Fratt Philips. I recently came into a treasure trove of historical information including a wedding photo taken in the parlor of the Fratt Mansion on Dec 10, 1917. This evening I wrote a blog post about it. It can be seen at:
http://www.wendellaffield.com/category/chickenhouse-chronicles

I would like to get in contact with the present owners of the Frat Mansion. I have read about the renovations they have done and I believe they would be interested in the information I have.

Thank you.

3 comments

  1. We are neighbors of the Fratt Mansion, and the current owners are Walt Gillette and his wife. I’ll walk a print of your request to him this afternoon.

  2. And here is the article regarding the renovations at the Fratt Mansion from the Everett Herald:

    Published: Thursday, September 10, 2009

    Everett couple’s renovations bring out the best in 1906 home

    By Sarah Jackson
    Herald Writer

    Walt Gillette has some advice for anyone getting ready to restore an aging home.

    “Don’t think of it as an old house. Think of it as a mature house,” Gillette said. “Honor it and treat it with respect.”

    Gillette is speaking from personal experience. He and his wife, Saundra Cope, have spent the past decade and countless dollars restoring one of the largest, most historic homes in Everett.

    They became students of history, architecture and patience in 1998 when they bought a $405,000 Grand Avenue home in need of updates.

    Their aim: Pay tribute to the prominent home’s first 100 years, but also prepare it for at least 100 more.

    Gillette and Cope’s extraordinary efforts on what is now known as the Charles D. Fratt house were recognized with a William F. Brown Award from the Everett Historical Commission in 2003, along with a place on the Everett Register of Historic Places.

    Saturday, the couple, both retired Boeing executives, will open their 7,800-square-foot home to the public for the first time as part of Historic Everett’s annual home tour.

    Residents familiar with Grand Avenue Park in north Everett are likely to know the Fratt house, a broad, three-story, craftsman-esque structure painted a soft, buttery yellow.

    Not by accident, it sits directly across from the tree-lined park overlooking Port Gardner and the Everett Marina.

    Fratt, a prominent Everett businessman in lumber and banking, agreed to build a house on the bluff only if the city extended utilities to the property and dedicated the land across the street as a park, even though it was originally plotted for residential lots.

    Fratt got his way, according to Patti Lohse with Historic Everett.

    Construction began in 1904, but the home was destroyed by fire on Feb. 8, 1905, a week before the Fratt family was to move in.

    When Fratt’s second attempt was ultimately completed in 1906, it was the only home on Grand Avenue within six blocks.

    Seven subsequent owners have occupied the home since then, including Washington Gov. Monrad Wallgren, who lived there in the early 1940s when he was a U.S. senator.

    Wallgren was a close associate of then-Vice President Harry Truman, who reportedly visited on several occasions during those years.

    Today, the second-story bedroom where Truman is said to have slept is decorated with Truman memorabilia, courtesy of Gillette and Cope, who delight in telling stories of history in the home’s many rooms.

    Visitors to the completely restored home will see a mix of craftsman and Victorian style, inside and out.

    Old-growth fir trim, once covered in layers of paint, is now stained a deep coffee hue that adds richness throughout the house.

    Thirteen leaded glass windows, created by Covenant Art Glass of Everett, feature a stylized tulip design that is repeated in some variation on every floor.

    Craftsman columns and corbels, also in the name of continuity, are present in areas old and new to create a seamless aesthetic.

    Gillette and Cope, whose passion for history saved the home from possibly being demolished and replaced by new construction, have restored, refinished or updated just about everything visitors will see.

    That includes roofing, siding, windows, woodwork, walls, fixtures, surfaces and the extensively manicured lush grounds.

    Remodeling projects over the years had taken away much of the eclectic home’s turn-of-the-century grandeur.

    Previous homeowners removed the home’s balconies and covered the original lap siding with shake siding. Double-hung windows were replaced with picture windows on the main floor.

    Gillette and Cope, working with a team of local designers and craftsmen, have tried to bring all those elements back, using pictures of the original home and clues they found in the basement, tucked in crawl spaces and buried in burn piles in the back yard.

    They’ve also dramatically updated the infrastructure of the home
    plumbing, wiring, insulation, heating, earthquake resistance and appliances
    with the hope that the home will last another century without extensive upgrades.

    Everett architect Doug Hannam said Gillette and Cope’s dedication to restoration is exceptional.

    “It’s pretty rare, the depth of detail and attention to detail,” Hannam said. “The whole intent was to do it right.”

    Though they’ve loved working on their historic home, especially hearing stories from previous residents and neighbors, Cope and Gillette’s greatest wish is that it remain a place for families, not a museum.

    “When you walk through a home and there are ropes, there’s a feeling of staleness. Life has left the home,” Cope said. “This home needs to resonate with laughter and sad and happy events.”

    Cope hopes that people on the tour will share what they know about the home’s history and place in Everett.

  3. Here is the article from the Everett Herald regarding the renovations:

    Published: Thursday, September 10, 2009

    Everett couple’s renovations bring out the best in 1906 home

    By Sarah Jackson
    Herald Writer

    Walt Gillette has some advice for anyone getting ready to restore an aging home.

    “Don’t think of it as an old house. Think of it as a mature house,” Gillette said. “Honor it and treat it with respect.”

    Gillette is speaking from personal experience. He and his wife, Saundra Cope, have spent the past decade and countless dollars restoring one of the largest, most historic homes in Everett.

    They became students of history, architecture and patience in 1998 when they bought a $405,000 Grand Avenue home in need of updates.

    Their aim: Pay tribute to the prominent home’s first 100 years, but also prepare it for at least 100 more.

    Gillette and Cope’s extraordinary efforts on what is now known as the Charles D. Fratt house were recognized with a William F. Brown Award from the Everett Historical Commission in 2003, along with a place on the Everett Register of Historic Places.

    Saturday, the couple, both retired Boeing executives, will open their 7,800-square-foot home to the public for the first time as part of Historic Everett’s annual home tour.

    Residents familiar with Grand Avenue Park in north Everett are likely to know the Fratt house, a broad, three-story, craftsman-esque structure painted a soft, buttery yellow.

    Not by accident, it sits directly across from the tree-lined park overlooking Port Gardner and the Everett Marina.

    Fratt, a prominent Everett businessman in lumber and banking, agreed to build a house on the bluff only if the city extended utilities to the property and dedicated the land across the street as a park, even though it was originally plotted for residential lots.

    Fratt got his way, according to Patti Lohse with Historic Everett.

    Construction began in 1904, but the home was destroyed by fire on Feb. 8, 1905, a week before the Fratt family was to move in.

    When Fratt’s second attempt was ultimately completed in 1906, it was the only home on Grand Avenue within six blocks.

    Seven subsequent owners have occupied the home since then, including Washington Gov. Monrad Wallgren, who lived there in the early 1940s when he was a U.S. senator.

    Wallgren was a close associate of then-Vice President Harry Truman, who reportedly visited on several occasions during those years.

    Today, the second-story bedroom where Truman is said to have slept is decorated with Truman memorabilia, courtesy of Gillette and Cope, who delight in telling stories of history in the home’s many rooms.

    Visitors to the completely restored home will see a mix of craftsman and Victorian style, inside and out.

    Old-growth fir trim, once covered in layers of paint, is now stained a deep coffee hue that adds richness throughout the house.

    Thirteen leaded glass windows, created by Covenant Art Glass of Everett, feature a stylized tulip design that is repeated in some variation on every floor.

    Craftsman columns and corbels, also in the name of continuity, are present in areas old and new to create a seamless aesthetic.

    Gillette and Cope, whose passion for history saved the home from possibly being demolished and replaced by new construction, have restored, refinished or updated just about everything visitors will see.

    That includes roofing, siding, windows, woodwork, walls, fixtures, surfaces and the extensively manicured lush grounds.

    Remodeling projects over the years had taken away much of the eclectic home’s turn-of-the-century grandeur.

    Previous homeowners removed the home’s balconies and covered the original lap siding with shake siding. Double-hung windows were replaced with picture windows on the main floor.

    Gillette and Cope, working with a team of local designers and craftsmen, have tried to bring all those elements back, using pictures of the original home and clues they found in the basement, tucked in crawl spaces and buried in burn piles in the back yard.

    They’ve also dramatically updated the infrastructure of the home
    plumbing, wiring, insulation, heating, earthquake resistance and appliances
    with the hope that the home will last another century without extensive upgrades.

    Everett architect Doug Hannam said Gillette and Cope’s dedication to restoration is exceptional.

    “It’s pretty rare, the depth of detail and attention to detail,” Hannam said. “The whole intent was to do it right.”

    Though they’ve loved working on their historic home, especially hearing stories from previous residents and neighbors, Cope and Gillette’s greatest wish is that it remain a place for families, not a museum.

    “When you walk through a home and there are ropes, there’s a feeling of staleness. Life has left the home,” Cope said. “This home needs to resonate with laughter and sad and happy events.”

    Cope hopes that people on the tour will share what they know about the home’s history and place in Everett.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s