History

Glass negatives 1

We found some interesting glass negatives in one of the boxes, and converted them for you to see. The box is labeled for Snohomish County, 1894-1908. So we don’t knew exactly when these were taken, but it’s probably near the turn of the 20th century. Some photos could be from the 1920s.

Woman in front of house.
Woman in front of house.
Interior of house
Interior of house
Along a river.
Along a river.
School room, possibly Shorts School (district 12)
School room, possibly Shorts School (district 12)
Three at the piano
Three at the piano
Children
Children, possibly in Machias.
Sawyer stop with Rucker gas car.
Sawyer stop with Rucker gas car. Tulalip Mill Co, built by Ruckers.

From David Cameron: Sawyer is the campground site named for the first Silverton Ranger District Ranger George Sawyer, who also was charged with creating and operating the Silverton tree nursery.  He was transferred to Skykomish as district ranger ca. 1920.  Weigle is the same place, the name changed to honor Snoqualmie National Forest Supervisor William Weigle.  He had gone through the catastrophic Idaho forest fires of 1910 before coming here and after retiring served as head of the Washington State Parks.  The mill should be that of the Tulalip Mill Co., built by the Rucker brothers ca. 1920 and never doing much.  It was right next to the Sinkhole and now is the Tulalip Mill Site FS group campsite.  The mill itself was razed, with many of the materials taken up to the Mackinaw mine off the county road up Weden Creek.  That was done by Ronald D. Taft, about whom there is much to write.  The Rucker brothers favored white and black, as at their Big Four Inn, so note the color of the mill.  The old gas car is similar to the ones they used on their Hartford Eastern Railway, which they obtained from the Northern Pacific.  So, I’d tentatively date many of those photos from the decade of the 1920s.

Close up of gas car.
Close up of gas car.
Fruit tree picking
Fruit tree picking
Playing with dogs
Playing with dogs
School interior, possibly Short School district 12.
School interior, possibly Short School district 12.
Baker Bell Lumber Co. and Hotel Pilchuck , probably in Bryant.
Parker-Bell Lumber Co. and Hotel Pilchuck , at milepost 66 on the Northern Pacific Line, two miles north of Bryant, eight miles north of Arlington. Pilchuck is no longer evident, and was located at the current Highway 9 bridge across the Pilchuck River.
School district 12, Shorts School between Snohomish and Monroe
School district 12, Shorts School between Snohomish and Monroe

From David Cameron: School District No. 12 was the old Shorts one, later becoming part of what is now a very geographically large Snohomish School District.  The Shorts road takes off from the old Snohomish-Monroe Highway right where it makes a 90 degree turn from south to east and takes you on to the KRKO tower “farm”. Across the Snohomish River directly to the west is the Bob Heirman County Park, and  a bit farther south it curves up onto Lord’s Hill and that county park.  That’s also NP country, Bob having retired as a fireman on it and the old line coming  north down the valley from Maltby past Harvey Field into Snohomish and on north to Machias and on up eventually to Sumas.  The section from downtown Snohomish to the Skagit County line is the Centennial Trail.

3 comments

  1. That’s the Parker-Bell mill and the Pilchuck Hotel in Pilchuck, WA about eight miles north of Arlington, right where the new bridge was built on Hwy 9 last year. Nothing left of the town, but the Centennial Trail runs along the railbed that can be seen right in front of the hotel.

      1. You’re welcome, but I noticed I said Pilchuck was 8 miles north of Arlington, and I think it’s actually only about 5-6 miles 🙂 It was great that the County convinced the State to leave the old bridge across Pilchuck Creek built next to the town in 1916.

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