Meet Author JD Howard this Sunday

Untitled-2Visit EMoH’s table at the Everett Farmer’s Market this Sunday, August 21st between 1 pm and 3 pm to meet local author JD Howard, pen name of James Cuthill. Mr. Cuthill wrote the newly published novel Sawdust Empire based on turbulent early years of Everett’s founding, including the Everett Massacre (100th anniversary is this year!).

The Museum’s booth has local books for sale, knowledgeable historians to chat with, and special guests.

Please stop by and say hi to us! Only two Sundays left!

The market has moved this year to the waterfront of the Port of Everett, to 615-13th Street.

More information and a map is here: http://everettfarmersmarket.com/directions/

We will be at the Market the following Sundays from 11 am to 4 pm:

  • May 22
  • June 26
  • July 24
  • August 21
  • September 18

Meet Local Author JD Howard Sunday

 

Untitled-2Visit EMoH’s table at the Everett Farmer’s Market this Sunday, August 21st between 1 pm and 3 pm to meet local author JD Howard, pen name of James Cuthill. Mr. Cuthill wrote the newly published novel Sawdust Empire based on turbulent early years of Everett’s founding, including the Everett Massacre (100th anniversary is this year!).

The Museum’s booth has local books for sale, knowledgeable historians to chat with, and special guests.

Please stop by and say hi to us! Only two Sundays left!

The market has moved this year to the waterfront of the Port of Everett, to 615-13th Street.

More information and a map is here: http://everettfarmersmarket.com/directions/

We will be at the Market the following Sundays from 11 am to 4 pm:

  • May 22
  • June 26
  • July 24
  • August 21
  • September 18

Glass negatives 10 — more group photos

From a box of 4″x5″ glass negatives found in the museum collection, here’s some group photos from approximately 1894-1920 (probably towards the early part of that period, since glass negatives were rarely used that late).

The first one is curious, because it had a piece of paper glued on the back, with a hole in the shape of a star. Was this man someone’s sweetheart? We didn’t want to remove the paper, in order to keep the object as found. But there are more people in the photo, hidden by that piece of paper.

IMG_5820_GroupAtLake_Stump_StarAroundMan
IMG_5820_GroupAtLake_Stump_StarAroundMan
IMG_5782_Man_TwoWomen_Farm
IMG_5782_Man_TwoWomen_Farm
IMG_5785_Woman_TwoChildren_Farm_Fence_Shack
IMG_5785_Woman_TwoChildren_Farm_Fence_Shack
IMG_5804_Toddler_Cup_Chair
IMG_5804_Toddler_Cup_Chair
IMG_5805_ThreeWomen_Baby_Foliage
IMG_5805_ThreeWomen_Baby_Foliage
IMG_5813_TwoWomen_Man_Child_Dog_OnStump_Bridge
IMG_5813_TwoWomen_Man_Child_Dog_OnStump_Bridge
IMG_5833_Group_Field_brush
IMG_5833_Group_Field_brush
IMG_5840_Couple_Portrait_ReadingBooks_Curtain
IMG_5840_Couple_Portrait_ReadingBooks_Curtain

Glass negatives 8 — making a living

Another set of images from a box of glass negatives that the Monuments Men and Women uncovered, while cataloging the collection.  These include farming, logging, mining, a greenhouse, and the Cliff House in Monte Cristo where mining was the industry. The photos are approximately from 1894-1920 — probably from the earlier part of that time frame.

IMG_5771_Family_Garden_Fence_BackYard
IMG_5771_Family_Garden_Fence_BackYard
IMG_5807_FarmerDrivingCowsOverBridge_Stump
IMG_5807_FarmerDrivingCowsOverBridge_Stump
IMG_5815_Cows_Horses_Buggy_Men_Woman_Baby_Field
IMG_5815_Cows_Horses_Buggy_Men_Woman_Baby_Field
IMG_5816_Cows_Men_Horses_Barn_Stump_Field
IMG_5816_Cows_Men_Horses_Barn_Stump_Field
IMG_5817_Family_Chickens_Barn
IMG_5817_Family_Chickens_Barn
IMG_5835_Greenhouse_Woman_Man
IMG_5835_Greenhouse_Woman_Man
Monte Cristo, WA -- now a ghost town, Cliff House: IMG_5839_CliffHouse_Woman_Child_Mountain
Monte Cristo, WA — now a ghost town, Cliff House: IMG_5839_CliffHouse_Woman_Child_Mountain
IMG_5855_Logging_Men_MaybeMine
IMG_5855_Logging_Men_MaybeMine
Sawyer, WA, on the Mountain Loop Highway: IMG_5857_Sawyer_Train_Tracks_Houses
Sawyer, WA, on the Mountain Loop Highway: IMG_5857_Sawyer_Train_Tracks_Houses
IMG_5859_Loggers_FelledTree
IMG_5859_Loggers_FelledTree

Glass negatives 7 — More home interiors

From a box of glass negatives recently digitized by your Everett Museum of History monuments men and women, here is a set of home interior photographs. Probably most are from 1894-1915.

IMG_5781_YoungAdults_Posed_Indoors
IMG_5781_YoungAdults_Posed_Indoors
IMG_5783_WomanAtDesk_PossiblyThruWindow_KidsPlayingBaseball
IMG_5783_WomanAtDesk_PossiblyThruWindow_KidsPlayingBaseball
IMG_5787_FourChildren_Chair_Curtain_IndoorPlant
IMG_5787_FourChildren_Chair_Curtain_IndoorPlant
IMG_5788_FLowersOnStand_Curtain
IMG_5788_FLowersOnStand_Curtain
IMG_5794_WomanSeatedAtPiano_Portrait_Wallpaper
IMG_5794_WomanSeatedAtPiano_Portrait_Wallpaper
IMG_5795_Furniture_Stand_Bookshlf_CraftsmanMagazine_Curtains_Carpet
IMG_5795_Furniture_Stand_Bookshlf_CraftsmanMagazine_Curtains_Carpet
IMG_5797_Baby_Bed_RockingChair_Curtain_Wallpaper
IMG_5797_Baby_Bed_RockingChair_Curtain_Wallpaper
IMG_5800_ChristmasTree_Man_Woman_Girl_Doll_Wallpaper
IMG_5800_ChristmasTree_Man_Woman_Girl_Doll_Wallpaper
IMG_5803_Strawberries_Bowl_TableCloth_Outside
IMG_5803_Strawberries_Bowl_TableCloth_Outside
IMG_5808_Woman_FischerUprightPiano_Stool_Table_Curtains_Lamp
IMG_5808_Woman_FischerUprightPiano_Stool_Table_Curtains_Lamp
IMG_5831_Furniture
IMG_5831_Furniture
IMG_5838_Girl_Piano_Stool_RockingChair_Curtains
IMG_5838_Girl_Piano_Stool_RockingChair_Curtains
IMG_5843_Man_Children_Door_String_Wallpaper_Magazines_Stove
IMG_5843_Man_Children_Door_String_Wallpaper_Magazines_Stove
IMG_5847_Furniture_Curtains_Stools_Chair
IMG_5847_Furniture_Curtains_Stools_Chair
IMG_5851_Baby_Highchair
IMG_5851_Baby_Highchair
IMG_5856_Interior_DiningTable_Chair_Curtains_Hutch_Screen_StovePipe_Chandelier_Light
IMG_5856_Interior_DiningTable_Chair_Curtains_Hutch_Screen_StovePipe_Chandelier_Light
IMG_5861_Women_Child_DiningTable_Chairs_Curtains_Wallpaper_Stove
IMG_5861_Women_Child_DiningTable_Chairs_Curtains_Wallpaper_Stove

Glass negatives 6 — Playing and riding

Here are some more glass negatives recently converted to digital by your museum monuments men and women. This set has lots of children, and a few people riding wheeled vehicles. The set is probably from 1894-1920. By the end of that timeframe, film had replaced glass for the vast majority of photography. One photograph appears to be from 1916.

IMG_5772_Boys_LogRolling_CrowdWatching_HorseBuggy
IMG_5772_Boys_LogRolling_CrowdWatching_HorseBuggy
IMG_5780_BabyOnBlanket
IMG_5780_BabyOnBlanket
IMG_5789_Woman_Children_Stream_Clearcut_Houses
IMG_5789_Woman_Children_Stream_Clearcut_Houses
IMG_5791_BoysNearStream_
IMG_5791_BoysNearStream_
IMG_5792_BoysTowingLogSled_Fence_Road_Tree
IMG_5792_BoysTowingLogSled_Fence_Road_Tree
Probably 1916: IMG_5798_Hikers_Bald_1916_Boys_FryingPan_FeatherInCap
Probably 1916: IMG_5798_Hikers_Bald_1916_Boys_FryingPan_FeatherInCap
IMG_5812_BoysWoodworking_Table_Hammers_Drill
IMG_5812_BoysWoodworking_Table_Hammers_Drill
IMG_5823_Children_OneHoldingBobcat_Snow_Forest
IMG_5823_Children_OneHoldingBobcat_Snow_Forest
IMG_5850_Man_Bicycle_Shed_Fence_Grass_TreeInBarrel
IMG_5850_Man_Bicycle_Shed_Fence_Grass_TreeInBarrel
Near Snohomish was the Bicycle Tree: IMG_5853_BicycleTree_Women_Children
Near Snohomish was the Bicycle Tree: IMG_5853_BicycleTree_Women_Children
IMG_5860_Horse_Carriage_ManDriving_DirtRoad_Field_Trees
IMG_5860_Horse_Carriage_ManDriving_DirtRoad_Field_Trees

Seeing Ourselves @ The Schack

Please join us for our second annual exhibition hosted at the Schack Art Center. Opening today June 22nd – August 28th, this exhibition features many images from the Museum’s vast portrait archive.

Remember Mondays are free!

In conjunction with the Schack Art Center’s retrospective of internationally recognized artist and Everett native, Chuck Close, Seeing Ourselves features a reimagining of historical portraits from the Everett Museum of History’s vast photography collection.

This exhibition examines the ideas of transformation through reproduction and replication, how we see ourselves, and what that means with modern technology. The images you see here have been duplicated and rescaled to create a unique and proactive dialogue with Chuck Close’s oversized, and, frequently, confrontational portraits, on view in the main galleries. They also create a new, wholly personal, interchange with the viewer. The viewer can compare the newly created imagery with the originals found in the accompanying catalog.

We, as humans, have always had the desire to create images of ourselves. Yet, in our earliest history, this method of immortalization was relegated to only ensuring a good hunt or ritual. In the ancient world, artistic representations of the human figure were limited to deities or spiritual figures, the wealthy, or those individuals deemed to have made an important enough contribution to warrant inclusion in this very rarified group, such as military and religious figures. Rarely were less important individuals documented for posterity, and if they were, they remained anonymous.

Evocative of our current preoccupation with popular Snapchat lenses, or colloquially filters, like rainbow puke or face swapping, both Medieval Eastern and Western portraiture traditions de-emphasized the human visage and embraced caricature to recreate the likeness of deities and spirits. Artists deformed or enhanced the subject to communicate a visual story so that the written word became unnecessary to a largely illiterate populace.

The Renaissance ushered in a new fervor for Humanism and the representation of the natural human and its perfection, much like our current trend of the #nomakeupselfie or #nofilter that have still been tweaked to flawlessness. This ideology was furthered by the introduction of oil paints allowing artists a versatility and range of depth that the tempera paints of the Medieval period did not. Nevertheless, the subjects of the portraits themselves remained almost always rich or important.

These mores loosened slightly in 16th and 17th century as depictions of middle-class life became the norm for many Baroque artists, yet their subjects perplexingly remained both anonymous and unnamed. It was not until the end of the 18th century, with the rise of an American middle-class who trended toward Classicism to reflect their new democratic ideals, and who were wholly independent of a monarchy or the church, that bourgeois portraiture became desirable, affordable, and popular.

Yet it was really the 19th century, with the advent of photography that the shift in favor of documenting the ordinary person came to prominence. In the early years of the century, travelling portrait artists produced images of middle-class subjects in various mediums including camera obscura silhouettes and miniature oil portraits. With the development of the earliest photographic incarnation of the daguerreotype, taken by massive, but still considered portable, cameras that would be literally strapped to the photographer’s back for their journey, the most elitist traditions of portraiture were completely invalidated. And by the end of the 19th century, anyone who owned a camera could choose what images they wanted to capture.

In the past twenty years, even greater strides in the democratization of personal representation have been made. History and the everyman responsible for it can be captured by anyone with a smartphone and shared with millions in seconds on multiple platforms. We can record and share the mundane, the silly, the prophetic, and the sublime. We can twist and change, deform and perfect, our own images with the touch of a button, no longer relying on someone else to decide how our image is presented.

While earlier generations had to wait patiently for their images to be developed, we now have the ability to instantly see our pictures, to edit them, delete them, to change them any way we like through any variation of applications, to represent the persona we want the world to see. This sense of immediacy, the ability in an instant to project a certain image, or thought, or event, or meal, or style, to our connected world is an entirely new notion and experience. But have we considered how that changes the way we view ourselves? Or how we view images from the past?

Nonetheless, we are still finding our way in a world where all shared images have the potential to become public domain, to have someone else take them, flip them, change them, make them into a meme, making their subject again anonymous, or like the historical images in this exhibition have them reimagined and presented to a new audience who have had no previous exposure to the original image. Once our image is out there, how do we control it? Can we control it?

Viewing the images in this exhibition through the lens of the historical significance of portraiture, as well as our ongoing obsession of documenting ourselves, Seeing Ourselves further examines the urge of every person to make their own mark, be it with a cave painted stick figure or a selfie, challenging the viewer to see the newly envisaged image before them.

The images included in this exhibition cross mediums, from photographs to pastel portraits and etchings to oil paintings. The viewer has the unique experience of seeing reproductions of both the original image, in the supplementary catalog, and the reimagined image, displayed on the wall, side-by-side and to posit the question: How would I have chosen to display these images?

So feel free when you go see the exhibition to take a picture with these faces from the past, add a filter, swap faces, use #emohseeingourselves, and make these images your own.

 

Glass negative 5 — Schools

The photographs is this set are from a box of glass negatives in the Everett Museum of History collection. We recently converted these to digital positives for you to enjoy.

 

IMG_5864_Girls_Classroom_Desks_Chalkboard_AsiaMap1920_LincolnPortrait
IMG_5864_Girls_Classroom_Desks_Chalkboard_AsiaMap1920_LincolnPortrait
IMG_5863_School, posibly the Snohomish Courthouse.
IMG_5863_School, posibly the Snohomish Courthouse.

IMG_5862_Teacher_Students_1897Mar19_Snohomish_Organ_Desks

IMG_5858_ChildrenOnWoodSlashPile_DirtRoad
IMG_5858_ChildrenOnWoodSlashPile_DirtRoad
IMG_5846_SchoolChildren_Desks
IMG_5846_SchoolChildren_Desks
IMG_5826_School, possibly the Snohomish courthouse.
IMG_5826_School, possibly the Snohomish courthouse.
IMG_5827_School_children_teacher
IMG_5827_School_children_teacher
IMG_5828_Ladies_School
IMG_5828_Ladies_School
IMG_5830_School_Playground
IMG_5830_School_Playground
IMG_5832_SchoolChildren_Teacher
IMG_5832_SchoolChildren_Teacher
IMG_5819_Cards_Wall_Wreath_SouthAmericaMaps_WashingtonMaps
IMG_5819_Cards_Wall_Wreath_SouthAmericaMaps_WashingtonMaps
IMG_5793_SchoolChildren_Desks
IMG_5793_SchoolChildren_Desks

Glass negatives 4 — group photos

From the box of glass negatives dating from about 1894-1920, here is a batch of group photos. They were quite popular! The glass negatives are 4″x5″ and from Snohomish County.

IMG_5773_ManyPeopleAtPicnic_Tree_Log
IMG_5773_ManyPeopleAtPicnic_Tree_Log
IMG_5806_LargeGroup_Forest
IMG_5806_LargeGroup_Forest
IMG_5809_LargeGroup_Forest_FlagNot50Stars_Bench
IMG_5809_LargeGroup_Forest_FlagNot50Stars_Bench
IMG_5810_Children_River_Tree
IMG_5810_Children_River_Tree
IMG_5811_Group_Fence
IMG_5811_Group_Fence
IMG_5814_LargePicnic_Group_Park_Fence_Trees
IMG_5814_LargePicnic_Group_Park_Fence_Trees
IMG_5821_LargeGroup_Chairs_Outside_Tree_Grass
IMG_5821_LargeGroup_Chairs_Outside_Tree_Grass
IMG_5834_Group_Fence_ForestInBackground
IMG_5834_Group_Fence_ForestInBackground
IMG_5837_GroupPicnic_Trees
IMG_5837_GroupPicnic_Trees
IMG_5841_Men_Women_Children_Bushes
IMG_5841_Men_Women_Children_Bushes
IMG_5844_LargeGroup_Picnic_Forest_Grass
IMG_5844_LargeGroup_Picnic_Forest_Grass